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OCTOBER | Print |

LA TRINA FOSTER WALKS THE CORRIDORS OF POWER TO SECURE MORE RESOURCES FOR TREATMENT & RECOVERY

LaTrina Foster & Karen Handel  

(ABOVE: La Trina Foster & US Congresswoman Karen Handel at the US Capitol in Washington, DC)

For LaTrina R. Foster, Director of the Fulton County Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Disabilities (BHDD), advocating for funding to provide services to Fulton County residents isn’t limited to the Board of Commissioners. She just returned from Washington DC, where LaTrina joined members of the National Council for Behavioral Health for their annual visit with Georgia’s US congressional delegation.

LaTrina  Foster & John Lewis

  (ABOVE: LaTrina Foster & US Congressman John Lewis in Washington, DC)  

It was a prime opportunity to discuss mental health and addiction issues impacting their districts, and advocate for more federal dollars for treatment. “I walked side by side with both behavioral health service providers and people in treatment, as we met with members of Congress,” says Foster. “Georgia’s elected officials were very supportive and appreciated our visit. More importantly, I got to meet with legislators who represent other parts of the state, in addition to Fulton County. It’s important to pursue funds that can be distributed statewide because everybody benefits.” The National Council for Behavioral Health is a national non-profit agency that advocates for people living with mental illness or addiction.

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 TRANSITION NEWS: FAMILY NIGHT AT THE CLUBHOUSE CELEBRATES SUCCESS & RECOGNIZES CHANGE

Employees

(ABOVE: Accomplishments of employees are recognized at the Oak Hill Child, Adolescent & Family Center)      

Change is the most appropriate word to describe the Fulton County Clubhouse for Youth Family Night held at the end of September. LaTrina R. Foster, Director, spoke to those in attendance about the transition to the new service provider, and recognized Clubhouse employees who landed jobs with the new provider. “I am happy that Fulton County provided employees with an opportunity for employment, and that grant funded employees had an opportunity for jobs with private providers during the transition process,” says Dr. LaJoyce Brown-Lewis. “I am proud that staff continued to provide services with compassion and professionalism during this time of personal challenge.” The meeting also featured a keynote speaker who was born and raised in South Africa during apartheid, and now resides in Atlanta. She gave a powerful presentation on living under the brutal period of strict racial segregation that lasted from 1948 to 1994, while pursuing educational opportunities that eventually brought her to the United States. During the meeting, a former Clubhouse participant received special recognition while visiting the staff and clients. Although this individual had a very troubled childhood, they praised the Clubhouse staff for turning their life around. At 16 years old, this individual has become a student at Georgia State University!  

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  IT WAS GOOD FOOD, MUSIC, FUN & FELLOWSHIP AT SOUTH TRAINING CENTER THANKS TO THE VARSITY!

Staff in front of Varsity Truck

 (ABOVE L - R: Carol Austin, Danielle Winfield, Angala Simmons, Sharion Arnold, Dr. Raquel Watson, & Latisha Lewis pose next to the Varsity Truck at the South Training Center)

“Whaddya have?….whaddya have?....whaddya have?” is well known to anyone who has eaten at the Varsity Restaurant in midtown Atlanta. The restaurant has been serving its famous hot dogs, french fries, and onion rings since 1928. Now, consumers at the South Training Center, their family members, and employees also enjoyed the famous fast food when the Varsity truck catered an all you-can-eat buffet at the facility. “It was absolutely delicious and you got a lot for your money,” says Tehillah Yisra’el, Administrative Technician at the South Training Center. It was a wonderful way to have an indoor picnic with family, staff, and clients. It was very well done.” Everyone paid $15.00 to participate, and Carlos Turner, who provides infor-mation technology services to the Fulton County Department of Behavioral Health & Develop-mental Disabilities, was the deejay at the event. The adult consumers enjoyed dancing to the sound of pulsating party music after finishing their meals. The South Training Center hosts many wonderful programs for their consumers and family members.

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 WHAT HAPPENED IN THE DARK AT THE SOUTH TRAINING CENTER EVENTUALLY CAME TO LIGHT

Clinic inspection

 (ABOVE: Angala Simmons & Lynnette Allen conduct an inspection of the South Training Center)

On Wednesday, September 20, 2017 at 11:20 AM, the lights went out at the South Training Center and the building was plunged into darkness. It was a practice exercise to simulate a catastrophic power outage and catalog how employees and consumers reacted. The findings were recorded and will be reported to the Joint Commission, a national organization that offers accreditation to health care facilities. “Drills of this type are very important for staff and clients to be knowledgeable about what to do in case of an emergency,” says Lynnette Allen, Program Evaluation Specialist who helped Angala Simmons record the results. Power was restored 45 minutes later. Meanwhile, the Center also is sporting a much needed new roof, and its an attractive shade of green.

 

   

 

         

 

   

   

 

 
 

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